Kana'iolowalu Video Frequently Asked Questions

Undeterred

A short historical piece about the unrelinquished sovereignty of Hawaii

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NHRC Chairman John Waihee at the 2013 CNHA conference

Chair Waihee's speech to the attendees at the 2013 CNHA conference held at the Hawaii Convention Center

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NHRC Vice Chair Na'alehu Anthony

Vice-chair Anthony's speech to the attendees at the 2013 CNHA conference held at the Hawaii Convention Center

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Unified

The foundation of our nation is unification.

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Unrelinquished

"the indigenous Hawaiian people never directly relinquished their claims to their inherent sovereignty as a people or over the national lands to the United states..." U.S. Public Law 103-150

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FAQ 09: What do I get out of registering with Kanaʻiolowalu?

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, passionately speaks about the benefit of having our voice heard and experiencing the satisfaction of claiming what is already ours!

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FAQ 8: What are the implications of the roll being

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, explains that the most important point to be made here is that Kanaʻiolowalu will be a public list, accessible to all.

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FAQ 7: Is Kanaʻiolowalu directly linked to federal recognition, precluding independence?

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, explains that Kanaʻiolwalu does not point specifically to, nor preclude any, options for self-governance; noting that Kanaʻiolowalu is restricted only to those “who believe in the nation!”

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FAQ 6: Number of registrants needed to succeed

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, references past similar efforts to answer the question as to how many names are needed for Kanaʻiolowalu to be deemed successful.

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FAQ 5: Why Kanaʻiolowalu now, after all the other attempts?

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, speaks to the increased importance of Kanaʻiolowalu because of other unsuccessful efforts; highlighting how many of the “heros” who came before us, “signed up for” numerous lists and initiatives, in the face of impossibilities. This is now our chance to do the same.

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FAQ 4: Is there a role for non-Hawaiians in Kanaʻiolowalu?

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, speaks to the importance of non-Hawaiians supporting these efforts and signing the petition in alliance with Native Hawaiians.

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FAQ 3: Next steps after Roll Commission dissolves

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, explains what happens when the Roll Commission dissolves after the one-year registration period has ended and points to the hope that the next generation of young Hawaiians leaders will take the initiative forward from there.

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FAQ 2: If I choose not to register now, will there be options for participating later?

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, notes that those who do not take the opportunity to register now will not be involved in forming the government but are not automatically precluded from being involved after the governing entity is formed. He also clarifies that anyone who enrolls may also disenroll.

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FAQ 01: Reaching Hawaiians Outside of Hawaii

Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Chair, Former Governor John Waiheʻe, lists efforts being made to reach Hawaiians outside Hawaiʻi including the use of social media and networking with clubs and organizations in various communities.

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